Video Game Accessibility: A Legal Approach

George Powers, Vinh Nguyen, Lex Frieden

Abstract


Video game accessibility may not seem of significance to some, and it may sound trivial to anyone who does not play video games. This assumption is false. With the digitalization of our culture, video games are an ever increasing part of our life. They contribute to peer to peer interactions, education, music and the arts. A video game can be created by hundreds of musicians and artists, and they can have production budgets that exceed modern blockbuster films. Inaccessible video games are analogous to movie theaters without closed captioning or accessible facilities. The movement to have accessible video games is small, unorganized and misdirected. Just like the other battles to make society accessible were accomplished through legislation and law, the battle for video game accessibility must be focused toward the law and not the market.


Keywords


Accessibility standards; video games; technology; Americans with Disabilities Act.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18061/dsq.v35i1.4513

Copyright (c) 2015 George Powers, Vinh Nguyen, Lex Frieden



Beginning with Volume 36, Issue No. 4 (2016), Disability Studies Quarterly is published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license unless otherwise indicated. 

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