Audio Description as a Pedagogical Tool

Georgina Kleege, Scott Wallin

Abstract


Audio description is the process of translating visual information into words for people who are blind or have low vision. Typically such description has focused on films, museum exhibitions, images and video on the internet, and live theater. Because it allows people with visual impairments to experience a variety of cultural and educational texts that would otherwise be inaccessible, audio description is a mandated aspect of disability inclusion, although it remains markedly underdeveloped and underutilized in our classrooms and in society in general. Along with increasing awareness of disability, audio description pushes students to practice close reading of visual material, deepen their analysis, and engage in critical discussions around the methodology, standards and values, language, and role of interpretation in a variety of academic disciplines. We outline a few pedagogical interventions that can be customized to different contexts to develop students' writing and critical thinking skills through guided description of visual material.

Keywords


audio description; inclusive pedagogy; writing across the curriculum

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18061/dsq.v35i2.4622

Copyright (c) 2015 Georgina Kleege, Scott Wallin



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ISSN: 2159-8371 (Online); 1041-5718 (Print)