Disability and Communication: A Consideration of Cross-disability Communication and Technology

Kirsty Best, Stephanie Butler

Abstract


The authors analyze the impact of marginalizing discourses surrounding disability on the design of communication options in online and virtual worlds. The primary focus is on conflict between participants in an ongoing study in Second Life, based on audio versus textual communication needs. Although the participants in the study are diagnosed with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, the difficulties faced in facilitating communication between the two groups reveal serious problems with current modes of live chatting which privilege one sense over the other, which would be relevant to other disabled populations. The inability to blend audio and textual communication creates an additional barrier for participants in the ongoing study in Second Life, and for visually and hearing impaired individuals who wish to use technology as a means of communicating with one another.

Keywords: Disability Studies; Communication; Hearing Impairment; Vision Impairment; Discourse model of disability; Myalgic Encephalomyelitis; Accessibility

Keywords


Disability Studies; Communication; Hearing Impairment; Vision Impairment; Discourse model of disability; Myalgic Encephalomyelitis; Accessibility

Full Text:

HTML


DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18061/dsq.v32i4.3290

Copyright (c) 2012 Kirsty Best, Stephanie Butler



Beginning with Volume 36, Issue No. 4 (2016), Disability Studies Quarterly is published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license unless otherwise indicated. 

If you encounter problems with the site or have comments to offer, including any access difficulty due to incompatibility with adaptive technology, please contact the web manager, Maureen Walsh. Disability Studies Quarterly is published by The Ohio State University Libraries in partnership with the Society for Disability Studies.

ISSN: 2159-8371