Editorial Policies

Focus and Scope

Disability Studies Quarterly (DSQ) is the journal of the Society for Disability Studies (SDS). It is a multidisciplinary and international journal of interest to social scientists, scholars in the humanities and arts, disability rights advocates, and others concerned with the issues of people with disabilities. It represents the full range of methods, epistemologies, perspectives, and content that the field of disability studies embraces. DSQ is committed to developing theoretical and practical knowledge about disability and to promoting the full and equal participation of persons with disabilities in society. (ISSN: 1041-5718; eISSN: 2159-8371)

 

Section Policies

Articles

Full-length manuscripts on research, theory, or reviews of the literature. Keep tables, figures and other images to a minimum; all such material must be accompanied by a brief narrative description. These articles will be sent to appropriate experts for review according to suggested criteria, without identifying the author(s). For a peer-reviewed paper example, see Personal assistance policy in the UK: What's the Problem with Direct Payments? Length: No more than 6000 words, excluding references.

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Interviews

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Roundtables

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Cultural Commentary

DSQ is a peer-reviewed journal publishing articles that meet the highest and most rigorous standards within their larger academic discipline. Manuscripts are anonymously reviewed by at least two scholars in the field. A limited number of manuscripts are published without peer review as Cultural Commentaries, specifically essays providing personal perspectives and analyses of timely topics relevant to the field of disability studies. All materials are reviewed by the co-editors for quality and appropriateness and are not guaranteed publication. Length: 3000 - 5000 words

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Creative Works

The work submitted should be conscious of disability themes and issues and should adhere to the philosophy of DSQ as expressed in paragraph three of the Statement of Principles. Although DSQ has no restrictions as to school or form, work submitted in this area should exhibit an understanding of conventions of fiction and poetics. Work in this area will be peer reviewed by scholars and writers working with disability in the fields of cultural studies, humanities, and/or creative writing. For a poetry example, see "The Things I Forget". For a short story example, see "Window Offices." Regarding poetry and fiction accepted for publication: By agreeing to publish in DSQ, authors grant DSQ first rights to publication of the work(s) and subsequent archival on the DSQ web site. Rights revert to author upon publication. Length: Varies

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Eulogy

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Book and Film Reviews

Do not submit completed reviews. Instead, query the review editors to propose works for review. Complete guidelines can be found in the Fall 2010 issue at http://www.dsq-sds.org/article/view/1290/1319

Editors
  • Margaret Price
  • Amy Vidali
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Tributes

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Special Topic Sections

Guidelines for Guest Editors Proposing (and Editing) a Special Section/Theme/Issue

The following are intended as general guidelines for proposing (and editing) a special section, theme, or issue of Disability Studies Quarterly. Each proposal idea will, of course, have individual variance in its development process, depending on such things as:

  • the resources of the proposal's editors (to complete the work proposed);
  • the depth and breadth of available scholarly/creative material related to the proposed theme;
  • the availability of reviewers for the proposed theme issue (who would not also be authors)

Potential editors of any proposed theme should consult with the DSQ editors frequently in the development of their proposal and, if accepted, throughout the editing process.

  1. Send a letter of inquiry to the DSQ editors about your idea OR complete a brief proposal.
  2. Complete a brief proposal, ideally 250-500 words, that addresses the following:
    • WHAT is your proposed topic/idea/theme?
    • WHY do you think this is an important topic?
    • WHO will be the likely audience interested in this topic?
    • WHEN would you expect the issue to be ready? (suggest a brief outline of the editorial timeline)
    • COMPETITIVENESS: Has other work like this already been published? If so, where?
    • DEPTH AND BREADTH: What is your sense of the depth and breadth of scholarship/creative material available in this area (topic)? Do you predict you will have difficulty finding contributors, etc?
    • MATTERS OF SPECIAL INTEREST: Are there any innovative features to the issue/theme you propose that you want to draw our attention to?
    • WHAT KIND of proposal are you making? Are you proposing a focused section (3-5 papers) or a more complete issue (that would also potentially include cultural commentary, creative work, scholarly work, book/film reviews related to this topic/theme)? Will your call for submissions to the theme issue by entirely open or do you have particular authors you will contact and solicit for submissions?
  3. Send the proposal to the DSQ editors; electronic submission is ideal. Expect a brief review/discussion process for your idea to take 1-4 weeks, depending on our next scheduled editorial meeting.
  4. If proposal is approved, develop a reasonable timeline for the issue/idea with the DSQ editors. In general, the entire production process will likely require12-24 months once a Call for Papers (CFP) goes out.
  5. Develop and distribute a Call for Papers (CFP). Even themes/issues that will rely on some solicited material should still have an open submission call for papers. Consult with DSQ editors about venues for distributing the CFP.
  6. Once a CFP is out, also begin to develop a list of potential reviewers for all submissions. DSQ is a peer reviewed journal and even submissions for a special section/issue should have at least ONE external reviewer (in addition to the issue editor). 2-3 reviewers is ideal.

A General Timeline might look like this:

  • Deadline for submissions sent into issue editors: 4-6 months from the CFP (time for submission depends upon the level of draft/finished product you expect)
  • (Issue) Editorial and review process once submissions are received: 4-6 months
  • Final copyediting of material: 2-4 weeks (At this stage the issue editors also write an editorial introduction for the material)
  • Coding and uploading to the DSQ pre-live stage: 2-4 weeks

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Special Topic: Mediated Communication

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Special Topic: International Articles

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Special Topic: New Conversations in Disability Studies

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Special Topic: Disability and Madness

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Special Topic: Museum Experience and Blindness, Introduction

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Special Topic: Museum Experience and Blindness, Part 1: Best Practices

Editors
  • Noam Ostrander
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Special Topic: Museum Experience and Blindness, Part 2: Curatorial Perspectives

Editors
  • Noam Ostrander
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Special Topic: Museum Experience and Blindness, Part 3: Personal Accounts

Editors
  • Noam Ostrander
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Special Section: Irving K. Zola Award Winner for Emerging Scholar in Disability Studies, 2012

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Humanities, Arts, and Media

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Social Sciences, Policy, and Applied Research

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Creative Works/Cultural Commentary

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Book and Media Reviews

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Special Section: Irving K. Zola Award Winner for Emerging Scholar in Disability Studies, 2014

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Forum: On the 50th Anniversary of Goffman's Stigma

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Report from the Field

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I. Shifts

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II. Energies

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III. Locations

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Special Topic: Growing Disability Studies

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Peer Review Process

All articles and creative works are reviewed by peers who have the appropriate knowledge and expertise. Final publication decisions are made by the Editor based on information gathered from the peer reviews.

 

Publication Frequency

DSQ is published by The Ohio State University Libraries four times a year: Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall.

 

Open Access Policy

This journal provides open access on the principle that making research freely available supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

 

Statement of Principles

By Rosemarie Garland-Thomson and Paul K. Longmore
Approved Fall 2003 by the Society for Disability Studies Board

The values and ideologies that shape social arrangements, public policies, professional practices, and, most important, the experience of "disability" are in the midst of a classic paradigm shift. Disability issues are demanding attention in every sphere and institution of society. Everything related to disability and people with disabilities is in the process of being rethought and needs to be rethought.

The academic study of disability has primarily been shaped by ideologies that define it as limitation in the performance of expected social roles due to underlying physiological pathology. That definition inevitably prescribes medical treatments and habilitation or rehabilitation as the appropriate solutions to the problems of people with disabilities. Yet those approaches have had only limited impact in ameliorating disabled people's socioeconomic marginalization.

In contrast to these traditional modes of addressing and studying disability, Disability Studies takes as its domain the relationship of social values to societal organization and public policies, professional training and delivery of services, individual behavior and interpersonal encounters, cultural representation and technological and architectural design. Disability Studies utilizes a multidisciplinary approach to analyze the intricate interactions among social, cultural, political, economic, and physiological variables. It seeks neither to jettison, nor to embrace medical paradigms of disability, but to transcend them. It explains personal experiences of disability, not simply in terms of the functioning of bodies that operate in nonstandard ways, but by locating those differences within the larger context of the cultural milieus that shape disability experiences. Disability Studies also seeks to supply the rigorous research and critical analysis essential to any effort at social reconstruction.

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

In pursuit of this vision and in support of an agenda that builds the academic field of Disability Studies in both the United States and globally, the Disability Studies Quarterly (DSQ) will provide a peer-reviewed forum for scholarship. It will represent the full range of methods, epistemologies, perspectives, and content that compose multidisciplinary Disability Studies.

DSQ aims to play a leading role in developing the field of Disability Studies by providing scholars with a vehicle to publish academic research that is credible within their particular fields of specialization. Discipline-specific articles must therefore match the highest and most rigorous standards in those fields. At the same time, all articles must be accessible to readers outside of those particular disciplines.

DSQ will seek articles that cut across disciplines and have implications for the full range of the field of Disability Studies. The ideal DSQ reader will be the general academic reader in Disability Studies. In addition, the journal will publish nonacademic essays that reflect the perspectives of the disability community. Finally, DSQ intends to fashion itself as a model of accessibility for academic journals.

ORGANIZATION AND CONTENT

DSQ will have a rotating editorship. The editor will serve for a term of three to five years. The DSQ editorial offices will be located at the home academic institution of the editor. The editor may hire a managing editor(s). The editor will recruit an editorial board that represents the various disciplinary perspectives of Disability Studies. In collaboration with the editorial board, the editor will develop a roster of referees to evaluate articles submitted for publication.

The journal will be produced permanently at the journals division of an academic press. The formats for DSQ will be special issues dedicated to topical themes, refereed articles, both short book reviews and essay length book reviews, and announcements regarding professional opportunities. In terms of accessibility, DSQ will not only offer alternative formats, but will also utilize the best access practices in terms of print readability, language style, and color contrast.



Copyright © 2000-13, The Society for Disability Studies. If you encounter problems with the site or have comments to offer, including any access difficulty due to incompatibility with adaptive technology, please contact the Web Manager, Laura Seeger. Disability Studies Quarterly acknowledges and appreciates The Ohio State University Libraries for publishing DSQ as part of the University's Knowledge Bank initiative.